Saturday, September 25, 2010

The Gay Psychiatrist: An Irony

Jeffrey S. Akman, M.D. is the Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, DC.


Dr. Akman is nationally recognized for his expertise in the areas of GLBT mental health and HIV/AIDS psychiatry. He has published articles and lectured around the country on these issues. Dr. Akman served as President of the Whitman-Walker Clinic and of the National Lesbian & Gay Health Association and on the American Psychiatric Association's Commission on HIV/AIDS and Committee on Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Issues. He has been multiply recognized as a "Top Physician" by Washingtonian magazine.

The irony is that on the issue of racketeering, Dr. Akman remains firmly in the closet.  During the period September 1992 to June 1996 I was an out-patient at GW.  At that time the Psychiatry Department was chaired by Jerry M. Wiener, M.D., a nationally-prominent psychiatrist/psychoanalyst: past President of the American Psychiatric Association and past president of the American Psychoanalytic Association.  I believe that Dr. Wiener facilitated the transfer of confidential mental health information about me, in violation of the D.C. Mental Health Information Act, to my former employer, the law firm of Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld.  I believe that Dr. Akman was aware of Dr. Wiener's illicit activities -- as well as the unlawful conduct of Stuart M. Sotsky, M.D. (director of out-patient care) and the unlawful conduct of my treating psychiatrists, Suzanne M. Pitts, M.D. and Dimitrios Georgopoulos, M.D.

The D.C. Attorney General determined that I formed a genuine, good-faith belief that a clinical professor of psychiatry at GW, Stanley R. Palombo, M.D. had unlawful communications with Akin Gump in the year 1990.  See Brief of Appellee District of Columbia at 10, Freedman v. D.C. Dept. Human Rights, no. 96-CV-961 (Sept. 1, 1998) ("During 1990, it appeared to Freedman that his coworkers were using words and phrases that he had used during private sessions with his psychiatrist [Stanley R. Palombo, M.D., clinical professor of psychiatry, The George Washington University Medical Center].  From this, Freedman infers that the psychiatrist was discussing his case with firm management.  R. 345.  The psychiatrist denied that he had any communication with members of the firm.  R. 345").

It is time for Dr. Akman to come out of the racketeering closet and disclose to the FBI what he knows about the illegal conduct of doctors at the George Washington University Medical Center Department of Psychiatry.

2 comments:

Gary Freedman said...

Tell me why this isn't simply opinion or logical inference: "During 1990, it appeared to Freedman that his coworkers were using words and phrases that he had used during private sessions with his psychiatrist [Stanley R. Palombo, M.D., clinical professor of psychiatry, The George Washington University Medical Center]. From this, Freedman infers that the psychiatrist was discussing his case with firm management. R. 345. The psychiatrist denied that he had any communication with members of the firm. R. 345."

A picture emerges over time from micro-facts.

When I told Dr. Palombo I was being harassed at Akin Gump he said: "Name names!" Why would Dr. Palombo be interested in the names of harassers?

I believed that J.D. Neary had a surreptitious consult with Dr. Palombo on Monday 4/16/90. Sure enough a few days later when a coworker F. Robert Wheeler said to Stacey Papa, "I'm going to call you Stan, Stacey Papa said "Stan is an ugly man's name, Stan is an ugly man's name." (Which carries the double meaning that Stan is an ugly name or that Stan is the name of an ugly man.)

Gary Freedman said...

Keep in mind, when I formed the above inferences about Dr. Palombo in 1990, I had no way of knowing that

1) I would be diagnosed with bipolar disorder in September 1992, which would later undergo spontaneous remission

2) I would later be diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia in February 1996, which would undergo spontaneous remission

3) Psychological testing in May 1994 at GW failed to disclose that I suffered from any mental illness at all, yet a psychologist would say I had a psychotic mental illness based on the test results

Isn't that a tad odd?