Friday, January 20, 2012

Hogan & Hartson: On Driving Your Supervisor Crazy

M E M O R A N D U M

DATE:   OCTOBER 17, 1985

TO:  SHERYL FERGUSON

FROM:  GARY FREEDMAN

RE:  PROPOSED REVISIONS IN DOCUMENT CODING PROCEDURES
_________________________________

Implementation of the following proposed revision in the coding and keying of documents could result in a significant cost savings in the preparation of a computerized litigation data base for MPS [Milwaukee Public Schools] documents.

At the present time, the coding and keying of documents are performed as discrete functions.  It is proposed, however, that the coding and keying of documents could be performed simultaneously by document coders keying the extracted data direct onto a word processor, rather than entering the data on coding forms.  Data extraction and data input would be combined in a single function, carried out by one individual, thereby eliminating the need for a separate keying phase.

It should be emphasized that the cost savings resulting from direct input document coding would not be limited to the coding and keying stages.  Additional cost savings would result by combining the now discrete functions of quality control of data sheets and the proofreading of keyed data.

Under current procedures, the document coder enters extracted data on a coding form, which is then quality controlled by a legal assistant.  The coding sheet is then keyed by a typist and finally the output is proofed.

Utilizing direct input document coding, the document coder would input the extracted data directly.  The output would thereafter be reviewed by a legal assistant for (1) accuracy of data extraction and (2) accuracy of keying.  Employing direct input, the now discrete functions of quality control of data extraction and the proofreading of keyed output would be combined in a single function.

Direct data entry promises a considerable cost savings over current procedures; the suggested benefits merit consideration.

1 comment:

Gary Freedman said...

The posted suggestions were never implemented during my tenure at Hogan & Hartson.