Friday, September 30, 2011

GW Psychiatric Treatment: Misdiagnosis of Bi-Polar Disorder -- SSA Fraud

In September 1992 I underwent a two-hour psychiatric assessment by Napoleon Cuenco, M.D. at the George Washington University Medical Center (Attending Physician: Daniel Tsao, M.D.).  Dr. Cuenco assigned the diagnosis bi-polar disorder (rule out schizoaffective disorder).  Dr. Cuenco claimed to have observed the mood-congruent psychotic features of racing thoughts, loose associations, flight of ideas, and pressured rapid speech: all symptoms of mania.

In February 1993 my then treating psychiatrist Suzanne M. Pitts, M.D. (deceased) prescribed lithium for bi-polar disorder.  I stopped taking the medication after several weeks.

On April 20, 1993 I filed a claim for disability benefits with the U.S. Social Security Administration.  My claim was based on the assumption that I suffered from bi-polar disorder as diagnosed by GW.

In August 1993 Dr. Pitts recommended that I take the anti-psychotic medication Haldol, days after I filed a complaint against her with the D.C. Medical Board.

On August 26, 1993 I placed a telephone call to my sister, Estelle Jacobson, in which I discussed my treatment at GW.  My sister was incredulous that I had been diagnosed with bi-polar disorder and firmly maintained that I never suffered from mania or bi-polar disorder.

The following is a transcript of a portion of that telephone conversation with my sister.
______________________________

[sister:] Well, either you have faith in your doctor or you don’t.

[Gary Freedman:] I have none. 

[sister:] Oh.

[Gary Freedman:] And it’s not in keeping . . .  Why is it . . .  And it’s not in keeping with their diagnosis. 

[sister:] Of what?

[Gary Freedman:] Bi-polar disorder.

[sister:] Oh no.  Well,  I didn’t . . .  you don’t have bi-polar disorder.

[Gary Freedman:] That’s what I was diagnosed as having: manic depression.

[sister:] But you don’t have mood swings high and low.

[Gary Freedman:] That’s exactly it.  Wouldn’t you say that would call into question her prescribing an anti-psychotic medication?  How am I supposed to have any faith in her?

[sister:] Mm-hm.

[Gary Freedman:] Would you have any faith in a doctor like that?

[sister:] No, I mean you’re definitely not bi-polar. 

[Gary Freedman:] Well, would you have any faith in. . .

[sister:] When are you ever manic?

[Gary Freedman:] Well, let me say something, Stell.

[sister:] Yea.

[Gary Freedman:] If a doctor were to misdiagnose and misprescribe one drug . . .

[sister:] So why would you . . .

[Gary Freedman:] Why would I have any faith  in the second drug?

[sister:] Yea.  I can understand that.

[Gary Freedman:] And you can ask her that question.

[sister:] Hm-hm.

[Gary Freedman:] And tell her that you don’t see any manic depression in me.

[sister:] Yea.

[Gary Freedman:] As far as you can see.

[sister:] No, I don’t see any mania.

[Gary Freedman:] I think she’s nuts!
_______________________

Thus, my claim for Social Security disability benefits was based on the misdiagnosis of a psychotic mental illness by the George Washington University Medical Center as well as the false sworn statements of my former employer, the law firm of Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, that I had been determined to be mentally ill and not suitable for employment effective October 29, 1991.

2 comments:

Gary Freedman said...

GW's psychological testing failed to yield any diagnosis or disclose any psychotic thought processes.

http://dailstrug.blogspot.com/2011/08/gw-psych-testing-concern-about-fraud.html

Gary Freedman said...

I love my free money!!