Monday, May 09, 2011

Letter to U.S. Secret Service -- April 19, 1995

April 19, 1995
3801 Connecticut Ave., NW
#136
Washington, DC  20008-4530

Philip C. Leadroot
Special Agent
U.S. Secret Service
Washington, DC  20036

Dear Mr. Leadroot:

This letter is intended to advise you of additional information that may be useful in your evaluation of my case.

1.  On file at the George Washington University Medical Center Department of Psychiatry is a memorandum prepared in April 1994, about one year ago, by my former treating psychiatrist, Suzanne M. Pitts, M.D., and sent to Stuart Sotsky, M.D.  The memorandum details and summarizes my mental state as of April 1994 and contains recommendations regarding future treatment.  I have not read the memo and therefore cannot relate the specific content of the memo.  I happened to see a copy of the memo on the desk of my current treating psychiatrist, Dr. Georgopoulos, some weeks ago, at which time I gleaned the memo's content.

The U.S. Secret Service may want to obtain a copy of the memo to assist in its psychological evaluation of me.

2.  I want to bring to your attention a curious feature of the results of psychological testing that GW performed in May 1994.  The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale ("Wechsler IQ Test") indicated an IQ of 129.  The attached memo to Yu-Ling Han summarizes the results of IQ tests I had taken in the past: at age 11 1/2 my IQ was measured at 125; at age 12 1/2 my IQ was measured at 122.

Psychological studies have established in recent years that mental illness, especially severe mental illness, tends to depress IQ scores.  One such study indicated that severe mental illness can depress IQ scores by up to 9%. It is indeed curious that IQ testing performed by GW in May 1994--at a time when, according to GW, I suffered from a severe and debilitating mental illness--indicates the highest IQ scores I have ever had in my life!  By analogy, imagine a situation in which a coroner pronounces a man dead, yet states in the coroner's report that the corpse had a post-mortem temperature significantly higher than was was recorded prior to death.

Sincerely,

Gary Freedman

ATTACHMENT TO LETTER TO U.S. SECRET SERVICE, DATED 4/19/95


TO: Yu-Ling Han
FROM: Gary Freedman
DATE: May 4, 1994
RE: IQ Test Scores

The following are the results of IQ testing performed in city-wide testing by the Philadelphia public schools.

1. Age 11.5 (6th grade) IQ score 125

Score breakdown not provided

2. Age 12.5 (7th grade) IQ score 122*

Score breakdown

Maps - mental age 20
Verbal ability - mental age 19
Graphs - mental age 18
Reading comprehension - mental age 17
Arithmetic fund. - mental age 15
Arithmetic prob. - mental age 15
(illegible) - mental age 15

*note that I had a false recollection on May 3, 1994 of this score as being 118

[Apparently, this is the letter to the U.S. Secret Service that I referenced in the letter to the FBI dated April 20, 1995.]

1 comment:

Gary Freedman said...

"By analogy, imagine a situation in which a coroner pronounces a man dead, yet states in the coroner's report that the corpse had a post-mortem temperature significantly higher than was was recorded prior to death."

Psychoanalytically, this is an interesting analogy. I used the same analogy in "The Dream of the Blue Oxford" interpretation, where I compared a subject of testing to a corpse.

"I receive a bill in the mail from the George Washington University Medical Center for psychological testing that had been performed in May 1994. I am angered because I had been told at the time of the testing that I would not be charged because the testing was being performed for didactic purposes. In view of the fact that my psychiatrist at GW, Suzanne M. Pitts, M.D., had told me that she had not been apprised of the test results, the testing had absolutely no therapeutic value. I thought: 'It's like billing a corpse for a didactic autopsy.'"



http://dailstrug.blogspot.com/2009/10/dream-of-blue-oxford.html